Join Me on April 23rd in Raleigh

If you are a reader or author interested in exploring the future of writing and/or celebrating local authors, please join me for a special event on Saturday, April 23: AUTHORS IN YOUR BACKYARD: A CELEBRATION OF LOCAL WRITERS Join 2016 Piedmont Laureate Katy Munger as she welcomes local authors in a celebration of writing talent. Katy will give a keynote talk on writing followed by author readings and a networking reception. If you're a local author and would like to attend, email library.cam@wakegovlibraries.com Saturday, April 23, 11am-1pm OR 3-5pm (2 sessions) Cameron Village Regional Library | 1930 Clark Avenue, Raleigh … [Read more...]

What kind of writer’s workshop would you attend?

I have been named the 2016 Piedmont Laureate and one of the responsibilities of that position is to conduct workshops for other writers in North Carolina. I’ll be doing just that in the months ahead as there are few things I love better than working with other writers and talking about writing. But with the world of writing in flux, and career trajectories no longer predictable, much less known, it’s time to look at exactly what these workshops should entail. I’d like your help with that. With that in mind, if you are a writer of any kind – fiction, non-fiction, short form or long – what kind of workshops centered around writing would you be most likely to attend? What would be most useful to you either personally or professionally? Is there a specific aspect about the craft of writing you would find most useful, or are you more interested in exploring outlets for your writing? While I do not conduct workshops on how to get published – that question is unanswerable at the … [Read more...]

Ignoring the Truth

This past week, socked under by a killer virus that would not abate, I sought refuge in reading true crime in front of the fire. I do not read just any true crime book that hits the racks, mind you, and you should not either. A large percentage of them consist of breathless prose highlighting the more lurid aspects of a crime, much like the detective magazines of (not-so-) old. But I do read good true crime because of the amazing psychological insights into human behavior that thoughtful reporting on a case can provide. This means I primarily read (or re-read) Ann Rule, who, until her death last year, stood head and shoulders above all other true crime writers. I know of no one else who has even come close to Rule’s ability to illuminate the cause and effects of aberrant behavior, in part because times have changed. The need to rush a manuscript to market—and be the first to offer a book on a major crime already well-publicized by other media outlets—means that few publishers are … [Read more...]

The Great Debate

Let us go then, you and I, When the evening is spread out against the sky Like a patient etherized upon a table…. These opening lines from T.S. Eliot’s iconic poem, The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, have sparked many a debate among literary fans: is it a beautiful metaphor for twilight’s stupor… or could it be a metaphor for life itself? As it turns out, it could very well be a metaphor for how T.S. Eliot felt when presented with a literary novel over one from his beloved detective genre. Yes, the undisputed arbitrator of literary genius was a huge detective fiction fan, a fact that the bastion of high brow writing, the New Yorker,revealed in this recent illuminating article. And not only was T.S. Eliot a devoted reader of the genre, he also wrote a number of anonymous reviews of detective novels and stories, defending the conventions of the genre with passion and advocating for some of its most notable authors in the time between the two great world wars. Where was T.S. … [Read more...]